Dropped Tail Pipe and Muffler

Monday, May 27, 1957

Dearest John,

Monday morning and I am not getting a thing done—sorta let down after yesterday. After reading your letter and hearing about your visit to the Millers, we decided that we would go down for a visit. So Sunday afternoon we ate our dinner then drove down and got back here in time for church. [Sunday evening service] Ed Dillon Jr. had the pulpit yesterday. [Plymouth Brethren share the pulpit between local and visiting preachers] We got to all the morning services, too. So it was a full day for us, and we were all too tired to get up this morning. For all that I am getting done, I would have done better to stay in bed.

This afternoon we (or I) go to the doctor and Mrs. Wolcott is going to take care of the two boys for me. The boys right away asked if they could take “Stories for Children” along to play on her record player and I said that they could.

Winne wants to drive down to commencement on Friday night and then drive right back right after that. If I can work it out I will come along—and leave the children here. That way I will be back in time to get things ready here for the recital on Saturday and straightened out for Sunday. But judging from past weeks, so much can happen in a few days that I am not counting on coming until I am on my way. We’ll not get there much ahead of time, so it will be a short sight of you, which will not be easy. But knowing that you’ll be home Sunday will help.

Yesterday we must have dropped the tail pipe and muffler along the road somewhere. I was careful not to drive above my regular 45 [mph] so as not to have oil trouble, etc. But on the way home the car began to sound horrible. And is it terrible now. I thought of taking it in to Don and Arnold’s but didn’t know if that was a job you would want to do or not, so I’ll stick close to home after today and wait until you get here, unless I hear from you to go ahead and get it done.

There are several of the young people that really need special help and prayer. I feel that that is a ministry I could do and am not doing and so far am certainly just wishing that I would; but haven’t the back bone to buckle down to business in intercessory prayer.

Miserably windy cold day today. I should make a fire, but I keep hoping it will warm enough so that I don’t have to do it.

Dave told me to get the youngsters’ registrations in to camp this year as someone in the meeting is going to pay for them, so I must do that today. They surprise me and are rather reluctant to want to go. They had hoped that we would be there for the whole time, but unless more buildings get finished that is out for at least the first of the season. Rain again most of Saturday at the lake so not much building could get done. It rained here in the afternoon – just when the parade for Michigan Week was to begin. They went on with it, bands playing away in a downpour. I took the youngsters in for it; we sat in the car to watch.

Well, I will close and make an effort to get things straightened out here before I go to town. When problems come up like the car, and a few others, I feel so helpless in knowing what is best to do—and how glad I will be to have you home. Like Jimmy says, “Daddy can fix anything.” But it is not primarily a handy man that I need here. To have your love and fellowship in person will be appreciated more than ever after these months. And still I must marvel at the way the Lord has worked things out this winter and taken care of us.

Always yours, Nellie

P.S. Jimmy and his questions. “Do we have ragged clothing?”
“The shirt you have on now is, but most things are good.” (I thought someone at Millers had said something. I don’t know how he wore that one there.) “Why?”
“Well, our teacher says, God said our clothes are filthy rags.”
So, I tried to explain that.
This morning – “How can we give our money to the Lord?”
“By giving it to people working for the Lord like Aunt Betty or Mert and Jane.”
“Well, how do they reach up to the Lord?”
More explanations. One thing is sure – Jimmy thinks.

Zacchaeus Kissing in the Tree

Saturday 5-13-57

My Sweetheart,

A rainy cloudy day so we are not getting anything done in the garden. I was hoping that we could, since David is home. He makes a good gardener, especially if I work along with him out there. But this rain should help our corn and potatoes to sprout that are already planted.

I was feeling rather blue last night because I didn’t make arrangements to come down to the banquet. I kept thinking that Jimmy would be coming down with the measles, so didn’t give it much serious thought until yesterday. Then just as supper time arrived Mrs. Wolcott called to remind us of an announcement that I hadn’t even heard that Leonard Brooks would be at the Chapel to speak. So it was good to have my mind diverted and we hustled around and went to that. We did enjoy his testimony – he went back and told a good bit about the war days there, then of his work and studies here in the states, and now how he is going back. Then he showed pictures of the work there. I’m glad that we got there.

After the meeting I called Mrs. Storms over to ask her if Karen and Mary Ellen would consider staying with the youngsters if I should be able to get away for any of the graduation exercises down at Emmaus [the college where my dad taught]. She thought that they would be glad to do it if I had confidence in them. The youngsters love them and would not mind being left with them. So if dates do not conflict with graduation here, why, I would like to come down and make an appearance before school is out. After hearing of the work all year, it would be a treat to see the student body and see, at least, the finish. Providing that would work out O.K. with your time there. I really would not enjoy it much if I couldn’t see a little of you.

Well, today Jimmy has a hollow cough, a half degree of temperature, and a nose that is beginning to trickle – so you can guess what is coming! He doesn’t complain and is playing inside as it is damp and cold out. I have a little fire going in the house.

I could write a page or two about Jimmy and the things he says. Time has not much meaning to a four year old. He came in last Sunday morning to ask if he could wear the overalls he had worn the day before. I said, “No, this is Sunday.” Beaming, he asked “Oh, is this tomorrow when we go to Sunday School?”
“How long till my birthday?” “Two more months.” “Is that as long as a year?”
Another time, “How long until the school bus comes?” “Just a few minutes.”
“Will that be about an hour?” I smile and give up.

The other day he came running in, “I know why Jesus came to earth.”
“Why?” I asked.
“To die on the cross for us,” was his answer and off he ran.
Next thing I heard him singing, “Zacchaeus kissing in the tree —-“
Did you catch your breath like I did? That line comes from a rhyme they use to tease the girls about their boyfriends.

I just told him yesterday that he was to visit kindergarten next week and we have been going through the questions of how long it is till then. It will be hard to break the news to him that he can’t go now with the measles! I’ll not say anything until he feels punk enough that he won’t feel like going anyhow.

The girls brought in a lovely bouquet of lilacs and narcissus.

I have to go to Howe for gas, milnot [canned milk], and want some seeds from the hardware store down there. So I had better stop this Saturday chatter and get to moving. Always plenty to do on Saturdays.

I hope someone moves in here that wants a large garden – as I still feel sure that we will be doing something else besides taking care of that this summer.

I love you, and am as bad as the youngsters about counting the days until school will be out this year. I hope you get a little extra sleep this week end – and you had better not count on coming home until school is out. If that Sorenson house should develop into a possibility perhaps that can be an excuse for me to come down on a Friday and then back on Saturday afternoon, so we’ll be together at least once this month and save you the tiring trip home when you have so much to get finished up. I’ll bring David along as he knows how to change tires and I don’t care to travel alone that far. Well, we’ll see, and I’ll not feel too badly if nothing develops so that I can come down.

Always yours,
Nellie

Patience and Perseverance

Monday 4-8-57

My Dearest:

It was just this morning that we said good-bye but I’m going to start out a little better than last time and get at least a little note off to you. I just finished a letter to my folks. I hadn’t written since they called me, so I did that.

I can’t imagine how tired you must feel – I’m weary and you must be just so much more so. I did listen to the radio and it sounded as though the most snow you had was here and that it got less going west. Bill M. said that it was about two inches there, and I know it was all of four inches on the car this morning.

David went off to school without his books, his gym shorts, and called to ask me to bring them in. I refused at first, but he called again and I guess Mrs. Rerick had scolded him and he seemed about in tears, so I broke down and took them in.

Most of the snow is off the trees now, but it is not melting as quickly as I thought it would. It is staying down around freezing.

Jimmy asked if he could buy a record player, so he could listen to the children’s stories record. Danny crawled out of his bed, looked for you, then hustled down to look for the record player and for your car. He concluded that you had really gone to Oak Park this time. Yesterday afternoon he wasn’t sure, but really cried his heart out that you were gone. [Our family had one portable record player. Evidently my dad took it with him at his teaching job, but brought it home on weekend visits.]

Did you find your Mother there or had she gone to St. Louis? With that she could come up here now, but I know that is impossible.

And was Dean ready, have you heard more from him, and did you get to school on time? ‘Nuff asked. I expect that you would answer all those things when you write, even if I didn’t ask — but, being me, I ask the questions and wait for the answers.

We will be praying as a family, and I will try to set aside time to pray for the work of the summer. Whichever, or whatever, if we know that it is His place, we know that He will help us to do the work required.

Jimmy is out fixing a sandwich for his lunch and I had better go help him out a little. He’ll get enough but Danny won’t fare so well. However, he doesn’t look underfed!

Thanks so much for taking care of the checkbook. And I feel awful about the income tax being thrown in your lap. As a help-meet I seem to leave all the work to you. But though I don’t do my share, I do love you, and your patience and perseverance does inspire me to work harder and more carefully. Take care of yourself and I hope you can get more rest these next few weeks. Now I must close.

All my love,
Nellie

[All Nellie’s letters to John can be found by searching Mom’s Letters.]